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These Autographs were collected by my Father over his lifetime! Stowe Vintage will feature Autographs of Hollywood Stars, Political Autographs, President's Autographs, Sports Autographs, Military Autographs, Entertainment Autographs, Authors Autographs, Historical Autographs, and More! Comes with a COA. Contact us at 802-253-7000 or stovint08@gmail.com.


 

                                    NEW LOWER PRICES FOR MOST AUTOGRAPHS!!!!!!!


VICE PRESIDENT HUBERT H. HUMPHREY AUTOGRAPH

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Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. was born May 27, 1911 – died January 13, 1978.  Hubert was the thirty-eighth Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. Humphrey twice served as a United States Senator from Minnesota, and served as Democratic Majority Whip. He was a founder of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party and Americans for Democratic Action. He also served as mayor of Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945–1949. In 1968, Humphrey was the nominee of the Democratic Party in the United States presidential election but narrowly lost to the Republican nominee, Richard M. Nixon. In a renowned speech, Humphrey told the 1948 Democratic National Convention, "The time has arrived in America for the Democratic Party to get out of the shadows of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights," winning support for a pro-civil-rights plank in the Party's platform. After leaving the Vice-Presidency, Humphrey utilized his talents by teaching at Macalester College and the University of Minnesota, and by serving as chairman of board of consultants at the Encyclopædia Britannica Educational Corporation. Initially he had not planned to return to political life, but an unexpected opportunity changed his mind. Eugene McCarthy, a DFL U.S. Senator from Minnesota who was up for re-election in 1970, realized that he had only a slim chance of winning even re-nomination (he had angered his party by opposing Johnson and Humphrey for the 1968 presidential nomination), and declined to run. Humphrey won the DFL nomination and the election, and returned to the U.S. Senate on January 3, 1971. He was re-elected in 1976, and remained in office until his death. In a rarity in politics Humphrey served as a Senator by holding both seats in his state (Class I and Class II). This time he served in the 92nd, 93rd, 94th, and a portion of the 95th Congress.


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Original Envelope that the Letter was sent in. Dated August 18, 1967, Postmarked Washington D.C. Upper left corner marked: THE VICE PRESIDENT WASHINGTON The envelope is addressed to: Mrs. Verne W. Day 1437 Lathup Saginaw, Michigan.


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Original Typed Letter on THE VICE PRESIDENT WASHINGTON Letterhead. Typed on Letter: 20510 July 28, 1967 Dear Mrs. Day: Even under the best of conditions, hospitalization is rather a lonely experience. Your message brought that extra ray of sunshine and good cheer that meant so much. Thank you for remembering me. With best wishes. Sincerely, Hubert H Humphrey.


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Close up View of Hubert H Humphrey Autograph. Perfect addition to your collection: You receive both the Original Hubert H Humphrey Typed Signed Letter and the Original Envelope. Regular Price - $ 199.99 / Sale Price - $ 125.00.


VICE PRESIDENT SCHUYLER COLFAX AUTOGRAPH

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Schuyler Colfax, Jr. was born March 23, 1823 – died January 13, 1885.  Colfax was a U.S. Representative from Indiana, Speaker of the House of Representatives, and the seventeenth Vice President of the United States. Colfax was born in New York City to Schuyler Colfax, Sr. (d. October 30, 1822 of tuberculosis) and Hannah Stryker. In 1836 he moved with his mother and stepfather to New Carlisle, Indiana.  As a young man, Colfax began to contribute articles to the New York Tribune on Indiana politics and formed a lasting friendship with that paper's editor, Horace Greeley. He quickly established a reputation as rising young Whig in Indiana politics and at 19, became the editor of a pro-Whig newspaper, the South Bend Free Press. In 1845, Colfax purchased the newspaper and changed its name to the St. Joseph Valley Register. Colfax was a delegate to the Whig Party Convention of 1848 and the Indiana Constitutional Convention of 1849. member of the state constitutional convention in 1850. Colfax was nominated to run for Congress in 1850 and lost a narrow race to his Democratic opponent. As the Whig Party collapsed, Colfax ran again, this time successfully, in 1854 as a Anti-Nebraska candidate in opposition to the Kansas-Nebraska Act. After a brief flirtation with the Know-Nothing Party, Colfax became a member of the new Republican Party that was being formed as a fusion of Northern Whigs, Anti-Nebraska Democrats, Know Nothings and Free Soilers. After Republicans gained the majority in the House in 1856, Colfax became Chair of the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads. Colfax was an energetic campaigner against slavery and his speech attacking the proslavery Lecompton Legislature in Kansas became the most widely requested Republican campaign document in that election. In 1862, following the defeat of House Speaker Galusha Grow's bid for re-election, Colfax was elected as his replacement as Speaker of the House. In 1868 he was elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket headed by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. He was inaugurated March 4, 1869 and served through March 4, 1873. Colfax was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination for Vice Presidency in 1872 and was replaced on the ticket by Henry Wilson, a Senator from Massachusetts. Compounding Colfax's ill fortune, he became embroiled in the Crédit Mobilier of America scandal and left office under a cloud of suspicion. After leaving public office, Colfax embarked on a successful career as a lecturer. On January 13, 1885, Colfax walked some ¾ of a mile in -30˚F weather to Omaha rail station in Mankato, Minnesota. Five minutes after arriving, he dropped dead of a heart attack brought on by extreme cold and exhaustion. He is interred in the City Cemetery, South Bend, Indiana. The towns of Colfax, California, Colfax, Washington, and Colfax, Louisiana, are named for Schuyler Colfax. The "Jewel of the Midwest," Schuyler, Nebraska, is also named after Colfax. The city is the county seat of Colfax County, Nebraska. The now ghost town of Colfax, Colorado was named after him. Colfax County, New Mexico is named after the Speaker as well. In addition, the "main street" traversing Aurora, Denver, and Lakewood, Colorado and abutting the Colorado State Capitol is named "Colfax Avenue" in the politician's honor. There is a street named Colfax Avenue, in the Grant City section of Staten Island, NY, and a Colfax Avenue on Chicago's Southeast Side. His grandfather William Colfax served in George Washington's Life Guard during the American Revolution became a General in the New Jersey Militia and married Hester Schuyler (Cousin of General Philip Schuyler.) On October 10, 1844, he married a childhood playmate, Evelyn Clark, who died in 1863 and had no children. On November 18, 1868, two weeks after he was elected Vice President, Colfax married Ella M. Wade, a daughter of Senator Benjamin Franklin Wade; related to Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes; see Dudley-Winthrop Family. They had one son, Schuyler Colfax III, in 1870.


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ORIGINAL SCHUYLER COLFAX AUTOGRAPH, HAND SIGNED ON CUT PAPER. HAND WRITTEN: SCHUYLER COLFAX WEST POINT, N.Y. JUNE 14, 1869 REGULAR PRICE - $ 350.00 / SALE PRICE - $ 195.00.


VICE PRESIDENT HENRY WILSON AUTOGRAPH

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Henry Wilson was born February 16, 1812 – died November 22, 1875.  Wilson was a Senator from Massachusetts and the eighteenth Vice President of the United States. He was a leading Republican who devoted his enormous energies to the destruction of what he considered the slavocracy, that is the conspiracy of slave owners to seize control of the federal government and block the progress of liberty. Wilson was born Jeremiah Jones Colbath in Farmington, New Hampshire. In 1833 he had his name legally changed by the legislature to Henry Wilson. Henry Wilson moved to Natick, Massachusetts in 1833 and became a shoemaker. He attended several local academies, and also taught school in Natick, where he later engaged in the manufacture of shoes. He was a member of the state legislature between 1841 and 1852, and was owner and editor of the Boston Republican from 1848 to 1851. Wilson was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1852 to Congress. He was a delegate to the state constitutional convention in 1853 and was an unsuccessful candidate for Governor of Massachusetts in 1853. In 1855 he was elected to the United States Senate by a coalition of Free-Soilers, Americans, and Democrats to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Edward Everett. He was reelected as a Republican in 1859, 1865 and 1871, and served from January 31, 1855, to March 3, 1873, when he resigned to become Vice President. He was Chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia and the Committee on Military Affairs. In 1861 he raised and commanded the Twenty-second Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Wilson was elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket with President Ulysses S. Grant to replace the controversial Schuyler Colfax and served from March 4, 1873, until his death in the United States Capitol Building at Washington, D.C.. He had suffered from paralysis from 1873-75. Among his works are: History of the Anti-Slavery Measures of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Congresses, 1861-64 (1864); History of the Reconstruction Measures of the Thirty-ninth and Fortieth Congresses, 1865-68 (1868); and an exceedingly valuable publication, History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, (three volumes, 1872-77). He was interred in Old Dell Park Cemetery, Natick. His desk was the desk used by Richard Nixon during his administration. Nixon really wanted the desk used by Woodrow Wilson, and when he asked for a "Wilson desk", he received the desk used by Henry Wilson. Nixon never figured out about this mistake until later on.


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ORIGINAL HENRY WILSON AUTOGRAPH, HAND SIGNED ON CUT PAPER. REGULAR PRICE - $ 250.00 / SALE PRICE - $ 95.00.


VICE PRESIDENT THOMAS A. HENDRICKS AUTOGRAPH

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Thomas Andrews Hendricks was born September 7, 1819 – died November 25, 1885.  Hendricks was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). Hendricks was born near Fultonham, Ohio and moved with his parents to Indiana in 1820. His uncle, William Hendricks, was Governor of Indiana from 1822 to 1825. He graduated from Hanover College in 1841, and was admitted to the bar in 1843, practicing in Shelbyville, Indiana. He was a member of the state House of Representatives in 1848, a member of the state constitutional convention, and elected as a Democrat to the thirty-second and Congresses (March 4, 1851–March 4, 1855). Hendricks was Chairman of the Committee on Mileage and the Committee on Invalid Pensions. He campaigned unsuccessfully for reelection in 1854. Following his tenure in Congress, Hendricks was Commissioner of the General Land Office from 1855 to 1859, and an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Governor of Indiana in 1860. He moved to Indianapolis in 1860 and practiced law. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate, and served from March 4, 1863, to March 4, 1869. He was then elected Governor of Indiana in 1872, serving from 1873 until 1877. Because of the death of Democratic candidate Horace Greeley days after the popular vote in the presidential election of 1872, Hendricks received 42 electoral votes that were previously pledged to Greeley. Hendricks ran as an unsuccessful candidate for Vice President on the Democratic ticket with Samuel Tilden in the following presidential election of 1876. He ran again in U.S. presidential election, 1884, and was elected Vice President of the United States on the Democratic ticket with Grover Cleveland, filling an office that had been vacant since Vice President Chester A. Arthur became President in 1881. He only served from March 4, 1885, until his death a few months later in Indianapolis. He is interred in Crown Hill Cemetery. With his death, the Vice Presidency became vacant until Levi Morton became Vice President in 1889. He is the only U.S. Vice President (who did not also serve as President) whose portait appears on U.S. paper money. His engraved portrait appears on the so called 'tombstone' $10.00 silver certificate of 1886. The nickname derives from shape of the border outline of his portrait, a shape that resembles a tombstone.


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ORIGINAL THOMAS A. HENDRICKS AUTOGRAPH, HAND SIGNED ON THICK CARD STOCK. WRITTEN: T.A. HENDRICKS REGULAR PRICE - $ 165.00 / SALE PRICE - $ 145.00.


VICE PRESIDENT LEVI P. MORTON AUTOGRAPH

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Levi Parsons Morton was born May 16, 1824 – died May 16, 1920.  Morton was a Representative from New York and the twenty-second Vice President of the United States. Morton was born in Shoreham, Addison County, Vermont. His parents were the Rev. Daniel O. Morton (1788-1852), a Congregationalist minister of old New England stock, and Lucretia Parsons (1789-1862). He left school early and worked as a clerk in a general store in Enfield, Massachusetts, taught school in Boscawen, New Hampshire, engaged in mercantile pursuits in Hanover, New Hampshire, moved to Boston, entered the dry-goods business in New York City and engaged in banking there. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1876 to the 45th Congress. He was appointed by President Rutherford B. Hayes as honorary commissioner to the Paris Exhibition of 1878. Morton was elected as a Republican to the 46th and 47th Congresses, serving from March 4, 1879, until his resignation, effective March 21, 1881. Presidential candidate James Garfield asked him to be his vice presidential candidate in 1880, but Morton turned down the offer. If he had accepted and history held true, this would have meant Morton would have become the twenty-first President after Garfield's assassination and not Chester A. Arthur. He asked to be Minister to Britain or France instead. He was United States Minister to France from 1881 to 1885 (a deluded Charles Guiteau reportedly decided to murder Garfield after he was "passed over" as minister to France). Morton was very popular in France, helping commercial relations run smoothly between the two countries during his term and he hammered the first rivet in the construction of the Statue of Liberty in Paris on October 24, 1881 (it was driven into the big toe of Lady Liberty’s left foot). Morton was elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket with Benjamin Harrison, serving from March 4, 1889 to March 4, 1893. Levi Morton was Governor of New York from 1895 to 1896. He was considered for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1896 which went to William McKinley. Following his public career, he became a real estate investor. He died in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, New York, on his 96th birthday, the only U.S. President or Vice President to have died on their birthday. He is interred in the Rhinebeck Cemetery. The Village of Morton Grove, Illinois is named after Morton. He provided the funding necessary to allow Miller's Mill (now Lincoln Avenue) to pass through the upstart neighborhood, and provide goods to trade and sell. Morton Grove was incorporated in December of 1895. Morton owned property in Newport, Rhode Island and lived on tony Bellevue Avenue in "Fairlawn," currently owned by Salve Regina University and housing the Pell Center of International Relations and Public Policy. He left a parcel of nearby property to the city of Newport for use as a park. At the corners of Coggeshall and Morton Avenues (formerly Brenton Road) this land today bears his name, "Morton Park." Morton was the second-longest lived Vice President, living to be exactly 96 years old, beaten only by John Nance Garner. Morton also survived five of his successors in the vice presidency, Adlai E. Stevenson, Garret A. Hobart, Theodore Roosevelt, Charles W. Fairbanks and James S. Sherman. He married his first wife, Lucy Young Kimball (July 22, 1836-July 11, 1871), on October 15, 1856 in Flatlands, New York. They had one child together. After her death, he later got remarried to Anna Livingston Reade Street in 1873. They had five daughters together.


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ORIGINAL LEVI PARSON MORTON AUTOGRAPH, HAND SIGNED ON CARD STOCK. REGULAR PRICE - $ 165.00 / SALE PRICE - $ 75.00.


VICE PRESIDENT CHARLES G. DAWES AUTOGRAPH

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Charles Gates Dawes was born August 27, 1865 – died April 23, 1951. Dawes was an American banker and politician who was the thirtieth Vice President of the United States. For his work on the Dawes Plan for World War I reparations he was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He served in the First World War, was U.S. Comptroller of the Currency and the first director of the Bureau of the Budget, and in later life the U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom. Dawes was married to Caro Blymyer on January 24, 1889, and they had two biological children, Rufus Fearing Dawes and Carolyn Dawes, and two more adopted children, Dana McCutcheon and Virginia. Born in Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, Dawes graduated from Marietta College in 1884, and from the Cincinnati Law School in 1886. While attending Marietta College he joined The Delta Upsilon Fraternity.  He was admitted to the bar and practiced in Lincoln, Nebraska between 1887 and 1894. When Lt. John Pershing, the future Army general, was appointed military instructor at the University of Nebraska while attending the law school, he and Dawes became acquainted, forming a lifelong friendship. Dawes' lineage made him the great-great-grandson of the Revolutionary War figure William Dawes and the son of Brigadier General Rufus Dawes, who commanded the 6th Wisconsin regiment of the Iron Brigade from 1863-1864 during the U.S. Civil War.  After Dawes finished his term as Vice President, he became the U.S. ambassador to the Court of St. James (i.e., to the United Kingdom), an office that he held from 1929 to 1932.  As the Great Depression continued to ravage the country, a desperate President Hoover asked Dawes to head up the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, and for a few months he chaired the agency. Dawes resumed a role in the banking business, becoming chairman of the board of the City National Bank and Trust Co. from 1932 until his death in Evanston. He is interred in Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago. His landmark lakeshore home in Evanston is owned by Northwestern University and operated by the Evanston Historical Society as a museum. Dawes was also a self-taught pianist and composer. His 1912 composition "Melody in A Major," became a well-known piano and violin piece, and was played at many official functions as his signature tune. It was transformed into a pop song ("It's All In The Game") in 1951, when Carl Sigman added lyrics. The song was a number one hit in 1958, for Tommy Edwards (Hatfield 1997: 360), and has since become a pop standard recorded hundreds of times by artists including The Four Tops, Van Morrison, Cliff Richard, Brook Benton, Elton John, Barry Manilow, and Keith Jarrett. He was also a member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, the national fraternity for men in music.


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ORIGINAL CHARLES G. DAWES AUTOGRAPH, HAND SIGNED ON CARD STOCK. REGULAR PRICE - $ 175.00 / SALE PRICE - $ 95.00.


VICE PRESIDENT DAN QUAYLE AUTOGRAPH

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James Danforth "Dan" Quayle was born on February 4, 1947. Quayle is an American politician and was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States, serving under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). He also served as a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from the state of Indiana. Quayle was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, to Martha Corinne Pulliam and James C. Quayle.  On August 17 at the Republican convention in New Orleans, Louisiana, George H. W. Bush called on Quayle to be his running mate in the 1988 United States presidential election.  Quayle was widely ridiculed in the media and by many in the general public, in both the U.S. and overseas, as an intellectual lightweight. Contributing greatly to the perception of Quayle's incompetence was his tendency to make public statements which were either self-contradictory.  His most famous blunder occurred when he corrected student William Figueroa's correct spelling of "potato" to "potatoe" at an elementary school spelling bee in Trenton, New Jersey, on June 15, 1992. Although he was relying on cards provided by the school which included the misspelling, Quayle was widely lambasted for his apparent inability to spell the word "potato".  During the 1992 election, Bush and Quayle were challenged in their bid for reelection by the Democratic ticket of Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton and Tennessee Senator Al Gore, as well as the independent ticket of Texas businessman Ross Perot and retired Admiral James Stockdale. As Bush lagged in the polls in the weeks preceding the August 1992 Republican National Convention, some Republican strategists (led by Secretary of State James Baker III), viewed Quayle as a liability to the ticket and pushed for his replacement. Quayle survived the challenge and secured re-nomination. Quayle faced off against Gore and Stockdale in the vice-presidential debate on October 13, 1992.  The Quayles live in Paradise Valley, Arizona. Quayle, then working as an investment banker in Phoenix, was mentioned as a candidate for Governor of Arizona prior to the 2002 election, but he declined to run. Dan Quayle signed the statement of principles of the Project for the New American Century. The Dan Quayle Center and Museum is located in Huntington, Indiana, and features information on Quayle and all U.S. vice presidents.


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Original Dan Quayle Autograph, signed on a 3 x 5 inch Index Card. Regular Price - $ 99.00 / Sale Price - $ 48.00.